WANEP’s Next Strategic Direction: 2015 - 2020

WANEP on Facebook

WANEP on Youtube

Nigeria -- Niger Delta Crisis and Yar’adua’s Administration: Critical Issues & Hurdles [February 20, 2008]

  • PDF

The progression of events in the Niger Delta represents both opportunities to find lasting solutions to the violence in the region as well as serious risks to the corporate existence of Nigeria and international energy. The 2008 budget, the first by the Yar’ Adua Administration, shows the extent of the nation’s dependence on oil and its vulnerability to risks posed by the prolonged crisis in the Niger Delta. Of the projected total revenue of N1,986 trillion, 80% is expected to come from oil1. Nigeria is the 6th largest exporter of oil within The Organization of Petroleum Exporting countries (OPEC) and supplier of 12 percent of the energy needs of the United States of America (USA)2. The continuous unfolding events in the nation have major repercussions in the entire Gulf of Guinea. No doubt, therefore, that the present debate on the USA’s future defence and military strategies in Africa in the guise of AFRICOM have not been unrelated to the challenge posed by the crisis in the Niger Delta. The international implications of the volatility of Nigeria’s oil rich region is viewed in its immense influence on the international oil market. In December 2007, the price of oil hit the $100 mark with attendant consequences on the pump prices of fuel the world over.

To read full publication download file

Download File
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (pb_nigeria_feb08.pdf)pb_nigeria_feb08.pdfNigeria -- Niger Delta Crisis and Yar’adua’s Administration: Critical Issues & Hurdles0 Kb

Cameroun: February Unrest: Causalities, Implications and Way Forward [March 11, 2008]

  • PDF

Dust is settling following violent protests that swept across Cameroon’s main cities of Yaoundé, Douala, Bafoussam, Kumba, Bamenda, Buea, Njombe-Penja, Obala and other localities in the usually renowned political hotspots of the country February 23-27, 2008. The riots led mostly by disaffected youths of the ‘Biya generation’ came in the heels of a transporters’ union strike against the soaring pump price of fuel. Human Rights groups now say more than 100 people were killed while the Communications Minister says 17 people were killed. The cost of the destruction is evaluated in millions of dollars.

To read full publication download file

Download File
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (pb_cam_mar08.pdf)pb_cam_mar08.pdfCameroun: February Unrest: Causalities, Implications and Way Forward0 Kb

Guinea -- Coup d’état: Its Inevitability, Legitimizing Factors & Lessons for Africa [December 29, 2008]

  • PDF

Following the death of Guinea’s ailing President General Lansana Conté, history repeated itself twenty four years after as the military have staged yet another coup. General Lansana Conté’s death was formally announced by the President of the National Assembly, El-Hadj Aboubacar Somparé, who called on the Supreme Court to formally declare a power vacuum and formalize a constitutional transition, and also tasked the military to man the country’s borders. Barely six hours after, the army led by Captain Moussa Dadis Camara swiftly staged a bloodless putsch. In a state broadcast on radio and television, the 44 year old putsch leader announced the dissolution of the Government, suspension of the Constitution and creation of a thirty-two man governing council- Conseil National pour la Démocratie et le Développement (CNDD in similar manner to what Lansana Conte did 24 years ago).

To read full publication download file

Download File
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (pb_gui_dec08.pdf)pb_gui_dec08.pdfCoup d’état: Its Inevitability, Legitimizing Factors & Lessons for Africa0 Kb

Ghana -- December 2008 Elections in Ghana: Stakes, Challenges & Perspectives [November 27, 2008]

  • PDF

In ten days Ghanaians would be going to the polls to choose members of parliament and a new President. The campaign euphoria and enthusiasm is heightening as the political and media landscape is rife with slogans, posters and v o t e r e n t i c i n g m e s s a g e s . Notwithstanding, the heated sociopolitical atmosphere has also been characterised by sporadic outbreaks of violence resulting in loss of lives and destruction of property. Given the fact that Ghana's election is so critical not only for the count ry's dr ive towards unperturbed democratic consolidation but also serves as the hope for Africa's democracy that has backpedalled in hitherto progressive countries, the importance of Ghana's election cannot be overstated.

To read full publication download file

Download File
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (pb_ghana_nov08.pdf)pb_ghana_nov08.pdfGhana -- December 2008 Elections in Ghana: Stakes, Challenges & Perspectives0 Kb

Guinea Bissau -- Post-Election Coup Attempt & Threat of Destabilisation [December 4, 2008]

  • PDF

In the early hours of Sunday November 23, 2008, the residence of the President Joao Bernardo Nino Vieira in Tion di Peppel quarters was attacked by assailant soldiers, killing one presidential guard and wounding others. This attack came barely days after November 16, 2008 parliamentary polls widely reported to have been free, fair and transparent. Immediate reaction from within Bissau, ECOWAS and the rest of the international community was swift and firm. In a press release issued on Monday after an emergency cabinet meeting, the Government of Guinea Bissau unreservedly condemned what it referred to as an attempted coup d’état and vowed to arrest and bring to book the perpetrators of such a heinous act. The population traumatised by years of instability quickly called for a mass demonstration in support of the democratic process and the country’s drive towards stability.

To read full publication download file

Download File
FileDescriptionFile size
Download this file (pb_guineabissau_dec08.pdf)pb_guineabissau_dec08.pdfGuinea Bissau -- Post-Election Coup Attempt & Threat of Destabilisation0 Kb